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Airliner Models: Marketing Air Travel and Tracing Airliner Evolution Through Vintage Miniatures by Anthony Lawler

$70
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Containing more than 800 photographs, Airliner Models chronicles the use of professionally made airliner models in the marketing of air travel since 1919. For model collectors, the airliner type, makers name, scale, approximate age and the materials used are detailed for each model illustrated.  A short history of significant model-making companies is covered.  

With the onset of online bookings and the closure of airline offices and travel agents, the use of models is fast vanishing forever. The focus of this book is to preserve this fascinating era when models were a significant marketing tool. To ensure that these models, at least in photographic form, survive as a record for future generations,  Anthony Lawler has spent eight years assembling the information and photographs to complete this book.

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MB
08/27/2020
Martin B.
Beautiful photographs and descriptions of airliner models as they, and their full-size subjects, developed throughout the 20th century

Anthony J Lawler, a successful airliner salesman, spent almost eight years of his "retirement" researching and bringing together the photographs of some spectacular models from his and other collections, and writing the accompanying detailed captions and explanatory text. To hold this beautifully produced book in one's hands and leaf, slowly through its pages is a wonderful and exceptional experience. Not only does it recount the history of airliner models and their makers, from the 1920s until recently, accompanied by over 800 photographs, most of them in color, but the text also relates the accompanying development of the corresponding "real life" airliners, large and small, over the same period. Add to that the delightful accounts of how the author managed to acquire some unloved models at quite an early age, together with his much later adventures tracking down models of various rare or missing types, and here's a very readable account of a fascinating subject, almost certainly the best of its kind ever written. It's a part of air travel marketing history that is fast disappearing with online booking, and the vanishing of the many airline offices that used to display these wonderfully detailed models.

HT
08/10/2020
Henry T.
A life time of valuable information and insight

I have know Anthony Lawler in the 3 - 4 decade range and he has been a terrific inspiration for me and my collection of professional aircraft display models since the beginning. This is an unbelievable coffee table photo book on a subject which is near and dear to my heart and the book is loaded with what I consider to be the vast majority of professional aircraft display models ever produced for industry. With lovely photos on every page of this hard cover book, the story of the development of the commercial aviation industry is told with simultaneous development of the professional aircraft models and their history and makers over the decades from the 1920s to the 1980s. The "Treasure Hunt" sections tell the personal stories of how the author came to own some of the most prized models in his collection. Weighing in at a very impressive 336 pages this book will provide years of reading entertainment for anyone interested in professional aircraft display models.

CS
05/12/2020
Chad S.
Superb overview of the growth of airliners, airlines, and travel agency models

This is a brilliant retelling of the history of airlines, viewed through the lens of vintage models. The author, Anthony Lawler, had a dream job: travel the world and sell Airbus jets. When not spending Airbus money dining potential clients at the world's best restaurants, he would scour travel agencies and haunt flea markets in search of desktop airliner models; upon returning to the U.S. he researched both the airplane and the airline. Successive chapters trace the way aircraft development and airline growth fed off each other; companies like Douglas and Boeing were inextricably intertwined with United, American, and Trans World Airlines. The book is big, heavy, packed with 800 photos, and beautifully printed. The text is interspersed with a few stories describing how Lawler found particular models; to my jaded surprise, I found them charming.